Making Headers with Photoshop

1st-header

For this header, I started by opening a new 1100 x 250 document.  I opened the above middle picture and cropped it to cut out unnecessary space.  I then used the “move tool” key to drag the cropped image into the newly created document.  With the image selected, I chose “free transform” to make the picture fit into the header.  While using this tool, I pressed “shift” to ensure that the image did not distort while I changed the size.  Once this picture was set in place, I opened the above left picture.  I cropped this image to cut out unnecessary space, and used “move tool” to drag it to the left of the previous picture.  I used “free transform” and “shift” to get the image into the proper size and location.  Finally, I opened the above right picture and cropped it to cut out unnecessary space.  I used “move tool” to drag it to the right of the other pictures, and then used “free transform” and “shift” to size it properly.  Once all the pictures were in place, I created a new layer.  In this layer, I selected the brush tool and chose white as the main color.  I used this brush to create white gaps in between the different pictures.

2nd-header

For this header, I started by opening a new 1100 x 250 document.  I opened the above left picture and cropped it to cut out unnecessary space.  I then used the “move tool” key to drag the cropped image into the newly created document.  With the image selected, I chose “free transform” to make the picture fit into the header.  While using this tool, I pressed “shift” to ensure that the image did not distort while I changed the size. Once this picture was set in place, I opened the above middle picture.  I cropped this image to cut out unnecessary space, and used “move tool” to drag it to the right of the previous picture.  I used “free transform” but I chose not to use “shift” because I liked the slightly distorted look.  Finally, I opened the above right picture and cropped it to cut out unnecessary space.  I used “move tool” to drag it to the right of the other pictures, and then used “free transform” and “shift” to size it properly.  Once all the pictures were in place, I created a new layer.  In this layer, I selected the brush tool and chose white as the main color.  I used this brush to create white gaps in between the different pictures.

3rd-header

For this header, I started by opening a new 1100 x 250 document.  I opened the above left picture and cropped it to cut out unnecessary space.  I then used the “move tool” to drag the cropped image into the newly created document.  With the image selected, I chose “free transform” to make the picture fit into the header.  While using this tool, I pressed “shift” to ensure that the image did not distort while I changed the size.  Once this picture was set in place, I opened the above middle picture.  I cropped this image to cut out unnecessary space, and used “move tool” to drag it to the right of the previous picture.  I used “free transform” and “shift” to get the image into the proper size and location.  Finally, I opened the above right picture and cropped it to cut out unnecessary space.  I used “move tool” to drag it to the right of the other pictures, and then used “free transform” and “shift” to size it properly.  Once all the pictures were in place, I created a new layer.  In this layer, I selected the brush tool and chose white as the main color.  I used this brush to create white gaps in between the different pictures.

3rd-custom-header

For this header, I started by opening a new 1100 x 250 document.  In the first layer, I chose a primary color of blue and a secondary color of white and made the gradient go from left to right.  In the second layer, I chose “brush tool #134” which looked like grass.  I chose a primary color of brown and a secondary color of white.  I then continuously applied the brush tool to the bottom right corner of the header to create a grassy effect.  In the third layer, I used the “elliptical marquee” tool.  This tool created an oval across the screen.  Once the oval was in the proper position, I used “fill” to make it a solid white.  In the fourth layer, I used the text tool to write “Summer Sky.”  I chose the font color to be black and increased the size to 72.  I finally used the “move tool” to center the text in the oval.

2nd-custom-blog-header

For this header, I started by opening a new 1100 x 250 document.  In the first layer, I chose a primary color of red and a secondary color of white and made the gradient go from top to bottom.  In the second layer, I chose “brush tool #134” which looked like grass.  I chose a primary color of purple and a secondary color of white.  I then continuously applied the brush tool to the entire bottom of the header to create a grassy foreground.  In the third layer, I used the “elliptical marquee” tool.  This tool created an oval across the screen.  Once the oval was in the proper position, I used “fill” to make it a solid white.  In the fourth layer, I used the text tool to write “Justin’s Lawn.”  I chose the font color to be purple and increased the size to 64.  I finally used the “move tool” to center the text in the oval.

3rd-custom-header-yeah

For this header, I started by opening a new 1100 x 250 document.  In the first layer, I chose a primary color of yellow and a secondary color of white and made the gradient go from left to right.  In the second layer, I chose the leaf brush tool.  I chose a primary color of green and a secondary color of white.  I then continuously applied the brush tool randomly throughout the header to give it a “leaves in the wind” sort of look. In the third layer, I used the “elliptical marquee” tool.  This tool created an oval across the screen.  Once the oval was in the proper position, I used “fill” to make it a solid white.  In the fourth layer, I used the text tool to write “Justin’s Leaves.”  I chose the font color to be green and increased the size to 64.  I finally used the “move tool” to center the text in the oval.

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